Collection: Soup Ladles

26 products
  • Letschef Nylon Ladle, Kitchen Cooking Utensil Nonstick Soup Ladle Spoon with Unique Stand-up Handle Design, Heat Resistant, Dishwasher Safe
  • Natural Spoon Classic Wooden Soup-ladle International Bamboo Kitchen Dinnerware Tools - Heavy Duty, Wood Spoon with Long Handles & Convenient Hanging Hook for Cooking in Restaurants or at Home - 1 PCS
  • Stainless Steel Oil Separator Soup Ladle,12 In Oil Separator, Heat Insulation Anti-scalding Plastic Handle, Oil Filter Skimmer Spoon Soup Colander for Kitchen (Sliver)
  • Nessie Ladle Turquoise by OTOTO
  • Rösle Basics Line Soup Ladle with 11.5 in. Stainless Steel Handle
  • Newness 2 Pcs Slotted Spoon and Soup Ladle, 304 Stainless Steel Cooking Skimmer Cookware Utensil, Thickening [Non-Bending] Long Handle for Serving & Scooping Sauces, Gravy and More, 9.8 Inches
  • Soup Ladles Stainless Steel 18/10 Kitchen Utensil Serving Slotted Spoon (5 PC Set Hooks)
  • DILUOOU Sauce ladle,7.5 inch Hammered 18/10 1 oz Stainless Steel Small Gravy Soup Serving Ladle for Cooking or Serving Soup Spoon,Dishwasher Safe
  • Rada Cutlery Non-Scratch Ladle – Heat Resistant With Stainless Steel Stem Made in USA
  • StarPack Basics XL Silicone Ladle Spoon (13.5"), High Heat Resistant to 480°F, Hygienic One Piece Design, Large Non Stick Soup Ladle (Cherry Red)
  • Chefa USA Silicone Soup Ladle - with Wooden Handle, Non-Stick Cookware Heat Resistant Kitchen Utensil - White
  • Norpro, Silver Stainless Steel Soup Ladle, 12.5-Inch, 12.5in/32cm
  • TBWHL Metal Soup Ladle 304 Stainless Steel Gravy Sauce Ladle with Long Handle for Kitchen 13.4"
  • KitchenAid Silicone Ladle, 13 inches, Aqua Sky
  • KUFUNG Silicone Ladle Spoon, Seamless & Nonstick Kitchen Soup Ladles, BPA-free & Heat resistant up to 480°F, Non-Stick Kitchen Cooking Utensils Baking Tool (Red)
  • Chef Craft Premium Silicone Ladle, 11.25", Purple
  • Doyingus 4Pcs Wooden Soup Ladle Natural Wood Soup Spoon Porridge Spoon for Kitchen Restaurant
  • Best Large Wood Ladle Spoon Handmade Deep Wooden Spoon Ladle 13 Inch Long Cooking Spoon Kitchen Soup Ladle Big Spoon
  • Wooden Kitchen Utensils Set - Non-Stick Bamboo Wooden Utensils for Cooking - Easy to Clean Reusable Wooden Spoons for cooking, Bamboo Utensil for Nonstick Cookware Set (5 Piece)
  • Reston Lloyd Calypso Basics 100% Melamine Ladle Utensil, 1 Piece, Lime
  • Ladle Stainless Steel ,11.5 Inch
  • Soup Ladle Stainless Steel Filter Spoon Long Handle Soup Spoon with A Lip Cooking Funnel Tableware Kitchen Can Hang Skimmer Spoon Soup Oil Separation(2 Pack)
  • KISEER Soup Ladle, Stainless Steel Ladle Spoon Set for Cooking Home Kitchen or Restaurant, 11 Inch, Set of 2 - Ladle/Ladle Strainer
  • Soup Ladle,304 Stainless Steel Long Handle Soup Ladle,Oil Separation Hot Pot Tool Fat Separator Filter Grease Spoon For Stirring, Serving Soups And More

Soup Lads

Soup ladles were created over one thousand years ago in the southern parts of China. There is evidence that soup was first prepared using a cast iron pot which was then coated in mud. This pot may have been an ox or a turtle shell and was a very heavy one. When preparing the soup the person who wished to make it would dip a ladle into the hot water and then throw the ladle into the fire, causing it to boil. This was a very slow process and only involved boiling water.

 

The first recipe for soup ladles was created around 500 years ago in China. The name for this particular soup was hulu. This type of soup has become known as tahu, which can also be a salt. It was a favorite with the Japanese, who would come and stay at the huts that dotted the island. The ingredients used were beef, radish, ginger, garlic, lots of onions, sesame seeds, rock salt, and white pepper.

 

Back when traveling was not easy many people had to take along their soup lads. These were tiny carts that could carry only so much food. It was also important that they had a handle on the cart so that they could easily pull it around. Soup lads would carry bowls of soup for everyone to share. They would also carry packets of rice and other foods that were needed for the journey.

 

During this time there was a great necessity for fuel and people turned to cooking meats in fat. There was a great demand for pork, which could be smoked. Meat of all types was used for sausage. Sausage was one of the main dishes that the soup lads brought home. They would also make a number of different types of breads that were used in the cooking of the meat. At the beginning of this century there were a great number of immigrants coming to the United States from China, Japan and other countries.

 

The early settlers made a great impact on the way that Americans consume food today. They brought with them a number of traditions. Many of these they adopted as their own but others they just took for granted. For instance soup is never served in public restaurants anymore. But instead they would go to a homesick neighbor's home where they would boil water for a pot of soup that was available. Soup also became part of country dinner parties.

 

Soup was served at the beginning of every meal. This was called hokkah. On Shavuot morning the Jewish New Year this tradition was continued with egg yolks instead of wine. In fact it was not until the Twentieth Century that Jews would begin to serve wine during the morning. Nowadays they still use the egg yolk in the past tense. But for certain feasts the liquid would be served after the cooking of the main course.

 

Throughout Europe soup has been a popular main course for many centuries. In much of Italy and Spain people would eat soup before and after their main meals. In England soup was often served at dinnertime (snacks are also called dinettes in this region of the world). Soup ladles are often used to accompany meals in the Middle East where soups were part of the festive fare that was prepared for Passover and Shavuot.

 

Soup is very versatile and very nutritious. It can be used as a main course, or even an accompaniment to meat or fish dishes. It would make a fine thing to serve at a get together with friends where everyone brings something to eat. For those watching their diet and wish to provide for their family's nutritional needs soup would make a fine change to their meal planning menu.